Monthly Archives: June 2012

Euro 2012 – Germany vs. Greece: Running Diary

Note: All comments occurred in real time, so please ignore that headache you’re getting from the lack of grammatical editing.

But first, a message from our sponsors:  This Running Diary has been brought to you by the Half-Asian Sports Guy and the Euro.  The Euro, bringing poor countries a taste of the northern European good life for 10 years and counting.

Pre-Kickoff

2:43pm – Merkel separated from Greek PM by UEFA president.  Who are those two German dudes behind PM?  Vendors?  Brown shirts?

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College Sports: The All-American Economic Inefficiency

Upon further review, the Half-Asian Sports Guy and his fellow lethargic sports fan, Anthony Colarusso, took it upon themselves to dig deeper into the structure that was an earlier piece on the economic realities of American collegiate sports.  This time we will forgo the half-hearted attempt for an allegory to 19th century America, although he topic will be mentioned later on.

As previously explained, this whole issue began during a discussion about the objectivity of the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament in determining the “best” basketball team that is a member of the Division I section of the NCAA institution in this country (Note: notice how you know exactly what I was talking about in that last sentence without ever bringing up the word “college” or “university”; this will be important later on).  Despite an impasse to the discussion, the assertion that the entire system should be limited to a few teams was countered with (and I paraphrase) “that would just make it another professional sports league” with the intonation that such an outcome was unwanted and counter to the status-quo.

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A Letter to Kevin Durrant

Dear Mr. Durrant,
I write to you today, first and foremost, as a sports fan and secondly, as Seattle Supersonics fan and a fan of basketball in the city of Seattle. I enjoyed getting to see you play firsthand as Seattle Supersonic, and knew then that your rare combination of elite skill and humility would carry you’re a long way during your NBA career. I have declared time after time that I could not root for the Oklahoma City Thunder because it was too painful to see a great, young team-my great young team, succeed after the key pieces were built in Seattle and taken away in such ugly fashion. While my bitter disposition toward Clay Bennett and the OKC Thunder franchise remains, I have reached a turning point in my professional basketball fandom where I can whole-heartedly root for you to win a NBA championship. In this day and age of NBA pre-madonnas and endless antics, you are truly a class act and deserve my support, as do the rest of your teammates. When you bring a trophy back to OKC, a part of me will feel that it belongs in Seattle, but nonetheless, I will be happy for you as a player and a person. I wish that continue on your current path and have a great illustrious career. Upon a Supersonics return to Seattle, in the hopefully not-too-distant future, I look forward to seeing a Sonics vs. Thunder matchup in the Western Conference finals for many years to come. Go Zombie Sonics!
Yours truly,
A Seattle basketball fan

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America’s Un-Professional Sports League

Many have called it a quintessential example of the true potential of the American experiment.  A testament to the virtues and benefits of our American system that allows for creation out of nothingness; the artistry that encompasses the blank canvass of our nation.  Across the United States exists a multitude of institutions that represent a key block to our macroeconomic prosperity.  While individually unique in their founding, history, self-image, and specific promotion, they are intertwined by what they represent: a common culture that is deeply woven into our greater cultural consciousness.

This culture has become ever more important and apparent in the Southern states, while other parts of the nation are also sympathetic to its practice.  While most are small and limited in their exposure, there are a select few large enough to be self-sustaining mini-social environments.  For these select few, they belong in a higher league of competition while representing the some of the most publically affiliated names in the country.  They are institutions unto themselves.  Fortunately, they are large enough to sustain enough of an internal population to produce a significant amount of their particular product.  Of course, an inherent part of this culture is the acceptance that those individuals committed to producing this product are not compensated with any monetary or financial benefits.  Instead, their basic life necessities, such as room and board, and the opportunity for a better life that otherwise would not have been available to them in their places of origin are collectively believed to be more than enough compensation.  But there is growing evidence that major and common aspects of these laborers’ work pose a serious threat to their long term health.  Of course, since this particular labor force is technically not a professional, but an amateur group, the otherwise widely accepted norms associated with fair compensation for the risk attributed to their work are forgone.  And since most of these individuals are not fully integrated participants in the greater political process, their ability to address their concerns to a wider audience is limited from the get go.

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2012 MLB Over/Unders – June Update

Before the start of the 2012 MLB season, in-house baseball expert Tony Colarusso, in-house gambling expert Miklos Bodnar and in-house Baltimore Orioles fan Steve Bailey took upon themselves to scrutinize the Las Vegas odds for Over/Under win totals for each of the MLB franchises.  And yes, I am aware that I semi-used myself in the third person in the last sentence.  Upon close inspection, predictions were given based upon both each team’s 2011 performance and their expected rosters/abilities to determine the expected win totals after the 2012 slog/marathon/Bataan Death March otherwise known as the MLB season.  While some usual suspects were given a vote of uniform confidence, such as the Chicago Cubs and Colorado Rockies giving their best Charlotte Bobcats impersonations while drinking the local Jonestown Kool-Aid for the Washington Nationals making a leap to .500 relevancy, most cases were not a clear cut decision.  A particular declaration by some predictors that the Baltimore Orioles would have less wins than games in a NBA locked-out season met particular consternation from the in-house O’s fan, something not seen since a Russian tennis player was locked out of a semi-faux bracket.

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